Action on Foot-and-Mouth Disease

Federal Agriculture and Water Resources Minister Barnaby Joyce.
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PRODUCERS, stock handlers, private and government vets and animal health policy-makers will receive first-hand insight into dealing with Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) thanks to the Coalition government’s $491,000 investment for training in Nepal.

Federal Agriculture and Water Resources MinisterBarnaby Joyce has encouraged industry groups that siton the frontline of managing an FMD outbreak, to participate in the training.

“A key part of our effectiveness to respond to emergency animal diseases is having trained people across industry who are our eyes and ears on the ground,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.

“This training is giving them invaluable experience in Nepal, a country where FMD is endemic.

“Seeing FMD up close and personal, including the symptoms and warning signs, will help them better understand the disease and what an outbreak could mean for Australia.

“Having more participants undertake this training, run by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, will help strengthen Australia’s ability to manage and respond to an FMD outbreak.”

Mr Joyce said the FMD training wasa key measure of the government’s biosecurity surveillance funding delivered in the $4 billion Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper.

He said since September 2013 the Coalition government hadinvested $1.1 million into theprogram, which was co-funded with industry and state and territory governments.

This has enabled 120 people to undergo training in Nepal, spanning across the pork, dairy, sheep, wool and beef industries, he said.

Mr Joyce said people undertaking the FMDtraining wouldbe subject to strict biosecurity screening on their return to Australia, “as are all people and goods arriving in our country”.

“An FMD outbreak would have devastating impacts on our valuable livestock industries, shutting down livestock movements, curtailing exports and savaging our trading reputation,” he said.

“A large outbreak of FMD is estimated to cost Australia more than $50 billion over 10 years.

“Australia has an internationally recognised capability to deal quickly and effectively with emergency animal disease outbreaks.

“Training industry members in Nepal is vitally important to equip participants with the skills and experience to recognise and report FMD symptoms and ensure we can act as quickly as possible should the need ever arise in this country.

“Australia remains free from FMD and we are doing all that we can to keep it that way, but you have to plan for the worst and ensure you are ready to respond.”

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Community anger over Inner City Bypass plans

Save our path: Regular users of Jesmond path are concerned the plans for the inner city bypass will make their commute slower and more dangerous.CURRENT plans for the Newcastle Inner City Bypass would be dangerous for cyclists and pedestrians, concerned residents say.
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About 70 people attended a meeting in Jesmond Park on Sunday in a bid to “save” the shared path that runs behind the park.

Newcastle Cycleways Movement member Ben Ewald, who spoke at the meeting, saidthe proposed Rankin Park to Jesmond link of the inner-city bypass would interrupt the well-used Jesmond path, forcingcyclists and pedestrians to wait at three sets of traffic lights to cross one intersection. He said it would be a “bad outcome” for people who use thatpath every day.

“Roads and Maritime Services have been conducting community consultation on this, and they have had the same feedback every time – that the continuity of that path should be maintained for the new project, and it wouldn’t be hard to do,” Mr Ewald said.

“What they have proposed is really unsafe. If people do press the button and wait, it’s inconvenient, but if they try to cross without the lights changing –which is what a lot of people do, then it becomes dangerous.

“Itwon’t have good visibility and it’s an accident waiting to happen.

“Let’s hope they are not downgrading cycling while they are upgrading the roads.”

People who use the path daily to travel to work or the shops attended the meeting.

Newcastle councillor Declan Clausen and local residentLachlan Wetherall addressed the crowd.

Community anger over Inner City Bypass plans Newcastle Inner City Bypass – RMS Environmental Impact Statement

Newcastle Inner City Bypass – RMS Environmental Impact Statement

Newcastle Inner City Bypass – RMS Environmental Impact Statement

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A little transport change no obstacle for fans

BRING IT ON: Suggestions of transport issues for Supercars fans have been rejected, with one keen observer saying many Newcastle residents are excited about the event.
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I HAVE read various opinions and comments over the past few months about the V8 Supercars so I thought it time to state some facts. I have been to six different V8 Supercars races over the past four years. Gold Coast, Melbourne, Homebush, Adelaide (street circuits) and Darwin, Ipswich (track circuits).

To all the street circuits I caught public transport. It was the most practical way of getting there and free public transport is included in the price of the ticket. I might add to get to the Homebush race I had to catch three trains, so to catch a train and transfer to a bus to go to the Newcastle race is no big deal. The two track circuits I drove to as they were way out of town but I had to park in a cow paddock and walk to the tracks some 10 minutes away.

Newcastle is now a city. It has changed from a shopping precinct to a new and developing residential and entertainment city and, like the other four cities with street circuits, parking is a premium. I’m sure the organisers will have satellite parking available with shuttle buses to the track. The Gold Coast race do this and it works well. We also have a large area at Stockton for parking and a ferry that will take you close to the track. So please all you Novocastrians –parking will not be an issue.

The four street circuits I’ve been to have limitations and limited atmosphere. With Newcastle having a great mix of grassed parkland areas with shade, the rise and fall of our coastal landscape, harbour views, ocean views, Fort Scatchley and a developing hospitality city culture, the Newcastle Supercars race has a great chance of becoming an iconic event, not only for Newcastle, but Australia.

Will it be a problem for the residents within the track area? Yes, it will be noisy and inconvenient and I wouldn’t be happy if I lived there. But I don’t live there and neither do the majority of Novocastrians, so it’s time the residents effected looked at how they can make the best of a bad situation.

Peter O’Neill,WarabrookOwnership a win for allAS a Cessnock business owner and passionate footy fan I can readilysee the difference that a winning Knights team delivers to town. Thepervading euphoria, the underlying pulse sees everyone swept along by the wave of positivity created when our team succeeds. Intangibleand invasive. No one knows why they feel better or the world seemsbrighter but that’s what happens. It’s real, it’s invaluable and it’s vital.

The past couple of seasons the heart and soul of our team has been missing. A community-owned entity will return that and do so tenfold. There is no risk. Imagine 100,000 doting parents, grandparents, brothers and sisters all supporting and shaping our baby.

For thosewho believe in the Knights – to be given the chance to nurture the cluband the wider feeder rugby league community this is a dream come true and whichever way one looks at it, community ownership can onlysucceed and the rewards will be shared across the region.

James Harvey, Licensee, Sternbeck’s Real Estate, CessnockKeep it on the corridorWHILE I didn’t support the trains being removed from Newcastle, Alan Squire is correct – the light rail should be going on the full rail corridor from Wickham to Newcastle (Broadmeadow may have been a better terminus) for the advantages that he outlined (‘Running light rail in corridor a win for all stakeholders’, Herald,8/12). I went to town on Thursday and found that Hunter and Scott streets were jam-packed with vehicles, which also affected the side streets.

How are light rail vehicles going to cope if they are to be installed along Hunter and Scott streets with the traffic jam that I saw on Thursday, especially with the low platforms proposed(and no, there was no work at the time to disrupt the traffic)? Sure, while Melbourne has extended some of its tram routes, those roads are suitable, but Melbourne’s two light-rail routes, Port Melbourne and StKilda were converted from train lines, allowing the light rail vehicles to be separate from road traffic on that part, and eliminated a change of transport mode.

As Alan said, the government’s own report says the best option for light rail is along the rail corridor.

Dennis Taylor, Adamstown HeightsUrgent need for actionI WOULD like to endorse the opinions expressed by George Paris (Letters, 6/12). Men and women who take measurements of natural phenomena are sometimes called scientists. However many people in the regions and in remote areas take measurements for the weather bureau and have done so for over 100 years. Anyone with the right equipment can take measurements ofCO2 in the air, the acidity and temperature of the oceans, the noting of changes in the occurrence of severe storms, floods, cyclones and hurricanes, the retreat of glaciers, the loss of the ice cap in the Arctic, the bleaching of the coral in the Great Barrier Reef.

How much notice we take of these observations depends on our education, experience and concern. Men and women who make a study of the trends in these happenings over time try to make connections between the data. They are the real scientists. The idea is to determine if there are indications that some action is needed to prevent a possible disaster.

The insurance companies are certainly following all these trends with great interest.

The indications are clear enough; we need urgent action to produce solar panels to generate renewable energy. The plant that was used to make cars could be converted to make solar panels and employ the redundant workers. We could set up wind farms at locations known to have constant wind conditions. The $50 billion the government want to give the prosperous companies could be used as a start in this important work.

John McLennan,CharlestownTrue cost of SupercarsMARK Creek’s letter (Letters, 10/12) simply proves my point about race promoters claiming success for an event without any mention of costs.The costs of building an internationally-approved race circuit through a heritage conservation area like Newcastle East will be huge and kept secret. The NSW Auditor-General’s report detailing both the costs and benefits of the V8 Supercars event at Homebush makes it very clear that the most cost-effective way of holding motor sports is to assist in building a permanent circuit that could be used for others events. Local Newcastle car clubs have been asking for such a facility for years.

Christine Everingham, Newcastle East


Short Takes

SERIOUSLY? A home owner couple with $375,000 in the bank and they’re crying because they may have their pension cut. The aged pension was designed to help the less fortunate manage to exist after retirement. Not help to leave a “nest egg” for children. No sympathy from this pensioner.
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Doug Ross, New LambtonAN EASYwayto fix the speed humps/pedestrian crossing in the central business district and Lambton areas is to paint them yellow as everyone knows a speed hump is black and yellow. This way everyone has a clear picture.

Sherrie Heaton-Lindus, Warners BayMARKCreek (Letters, 3/1) needs to supply more information about how loud these cars are. Is the 95bB measured at the noise source and what is the noise limit at the appropriate Australian Standard distance from the noise source?By the way, my chainsaw is rated at 90dBA, so this is an indication of how loud the cars could be.

Graeme O’Brien,BulgaTO Valeria Maggiacomo (Letters, 3/1): If you choose to stay away from Stockton for the next fireworks then the council will have succeeded. I think this administration cannot see past the Honeysuckle “Golden Mile”. No camping, no toilets, no parking, no bins, no joke. Ratepayers not prepared to cram into the new CBDbe damned.

Fiona Britten, StocktonI LIKE the work Nathan Brown is doing andI liked the efforthis young side put in last year. How about we wish for a grand final this year between my beloved Bunnies andthe Knights? I’ll drink to that.

Ron Elphick,Buff PointIN regards to the Supercars in the East End, I notice people who don’t live there are quite happy for the races but they belong to the mob who believe in the old saying “not in my back yard”.

Colin Atkins, WyongI HOPE David Leyonhjelm doesn’t take his pension when he retires. I was happy to take mine as I worked for 50 years, including 13 in the armed services with war service, and paid tax every day. If he thinks it’s nothing to be proud of I would like to see him work for 50 years, but being a politician he may only do six and still get a big pension.

Barry Spaulding, CardiffI HAVE lived in Port Stephens for over 35 years. I, like many people in the area, live here mainly because of our semi rural, small communities, tourism baseand thehigh percentage of retirees and visitors. This year we have seen an extraordinary amount of visitors enjoy our pristine waterways and beaches. Whilst the people of Newcastle are great, I think their city is completely opposite to the Port Stephens culture. So please get behind our mayor and his councillors and staff in telling the NSW Premier our only amalgamation should be with Dungog, for all concerned.

Gerry Mohan, Shoal BayTHE POLLSDOESthe kennel industry need a standard code of practice?

Yes 95.9%,No 4.1%


Peter Cousens named our Australia Day ambassador

ACTOR Peter Cousens has been named the Australia Day ambassador for Port Macquarie-Hastings by the Australia Day Council of NSW (ADCNSW).
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This Australia Day, communities across the Hastings will celebrate what it means to be Australian with more than 130 much-loved Aussies including sporting, entertainment, lifestyle and arts personalities.

“New South Wales is home to some of this country’s best known personalities and through the Australia Day Ambassador Program, communities across our state have the opportunity to host and share Australia Day with icons of sport, media and the arts among other fields,” said Angelos Frangopoulos, chairman of the Australia Day Council of NSW.

With this year’s Australia Day themeAustralia Day – Everyone, Everywhere, the Australia Day Ambassadors will look beyond community borders to demonstrate how Australia Day is celebrated across the world, encouraging people to go online and share their celebrations using the hashtag #AustraliaDay.

Whether it’s a barbecue with friends and family, a day on Sydney Harbour or some backyard cricket, our Australia Day ambassadors will tell the story of the many unique and special ways in which Australians celebrate. Images and bios can be downloaded from梧桐夜网australiaday南京夜网419论坛

Peter CousensPeter Cousens, a graduate of the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA), is an actor, singer, producer, director, teacher and film director. He is the only Australian to play the role of The Phantom inThe Phantom of the Operaon London’s West End. He has starred alongside Russel Crowe inBlood Brothers, the late Richard Harris inCamelotand has had an extensive career playing major roles in plays and musicals throughout Australia, New Zealand and England.

From 2006 to 2008 he was CEO and Artistic Director of Kookaburra: The National Musical Theatre Company and produced seven musicals, two major concerts and fourteen cabaret events.

Since 2013 Peter has been the Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Creative and Performing Arts and Artistic Ambassador for the Bachelor of Theatre program at Central Queensland University.

His musical theatre roles include Tonyin West Side Story; Eddie inBlood Brothers; Mordred inCamelot; Chris inMiss Saigon; Nanki Poo inThe Mikado; Motel inThe Fiddler on the Roof; Bill inThe Sentimental Bloke; Raoul in the Australian production ofThe Phantom Of The Opera; The Phantom in London’s West End production ofThe Phantom of the Opera; Alexin Aspects of Love; Marius inLes Miserables; Ravenal in Hal Prince’s Show Boat;Marius inFanny; The Celebrant inBernstein’s Mass;Anthony and Tobias inSweeney Todd; Bobby inCompany; Mr Makin inThe Hatpin; Floyd inFloyd Collins; Vince inStrange Bedfellows – The Musical.

As an actor he has worked extensively with Australia’s major performing arts companies including Sydney Theatre CompanyMacbeth, Measure for Measure, Nicholas Nickleby, Chicago, ChinchillaandConvict’s Opera; GriffinThe Falls; Philip Street TheatreWhose Life is it Anyway; The Queensland Theatre Company,Camille, Breaker Morant, You Never Can Tell, The Sentimental Bloke; Marian Street, London AssuranceandFanny; Melbourne Theatre Company,Company;Sydney Dance CompanyTivoli; Out of Joint (UK)The Convicts Opera; Darlinghurst TheatreThe Paris Letter.

Peter won the Variety Heart Award for Best Performer for Chris in Miss Saigon. He has been nominated for seven Mo Awards and in 2009 he won the Glug Award for Services to Theatre.

Peter is an Ambassador for Destiny Rescue an Australian based organisation committed to rescuing young people from human trafficking across South East Asia.

Currently Peter is developing a feature film based on the Daniel Morcombe story which he is directing and co-writing.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Family violence leave needed

TASMANIAN anti-domestic violence advocates have claimed that existing modern award leave entitlements inadequately deal with the issue and may keep victims locked intoharmful relationships.
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The Fair Work Commission is reviewing whether 10 days of paid leave specifically for domestic violence should be included in all modern awards, above sick and personal leave entitlements.

The issue was broachedbyFinance Minister Mathias Cormann over the weekend who told Sky News that leave would be too expensive for businesses and could have “counterproductive consequences”.

Women’s Legal Service Tasmania chief executive Susan Fahey said it was potentially more costly and counterproductiveto a workplace tonot havethe entitlement.

She said the adverse impacts that stresses fromdomestic violence had on a person’s health could lead to higher instances of sick leave, and unwell employees, forced to turn up to work, could impact on a business’ workplace productivity or injury measures.

In a submission to Fair Work’s investigation, Women’s Health Tasmania acting-executive officerJen Van-Achterensaid economic factors influenced whether a person who experienced domestic violence remained in, left, or returned to that relationship.

She saidleave allowed victims to attendlegal, financial or medical appointments without being financially disadvantaged.

Ms Van-Achterensaid workplaces that provided family violence leave only reported a small amount of requests.

Community Public Sector Union national secretaryNadine Flood said a senate inquiry into public sector bargaining revealed a lack of understanding from department bosses of domestic violence issues.

“I’ve personally spoken to a woman in the Department of Human Services who needed support to escape an abusive partner, but was instead placed on performance management for taking too much sick leave and then demoted,” she said.

“She then couldn’t afford to leave her partner as her pay had dropped.”

Tasmanian Chamber of Commerce and Industry chief executive Michael Bailey said while business hada part to play in supporting domestic violence victims and fighting against the issue,education was still the most important element in reducing itsprevalence.

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Short Takes

WOO hoo. This is by far a better street layout for the Supercars than the original proposal. However, it will still not appease some of the Eastenders. As for the waffle about interruption to those wanting to go to Nobbys etc, we still have plenty of other beautiful beaches within five minutes, unless they have forgotten.
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Tony Mansfield, LambtonI WOULD rather have a share in the Old Post Office than a football team.

Dean Briggs, NewcastleCAN anything happen in this city without some small group trying to derail it? We have people in the East End who seem to think the city belongs to them that don’t want the Supercars for one weekend a year. We have a grand total of 70 cyclists who want the inner-city bypass redesigned so they don’t have to go through the inconvenience of pressing a pedestrian crossing button. If you hate progress, move somewhere else.

Philip Niddrie, KotaraFOR 68 years the bride and I discussed every issue and together decided what action needed to be taken. When agreement could not be reached, it went to a majority vote. It worked for us. Eh? Coming up, luv. The kettle’s on.

Ron Elphick,Buff PointWHY would a young Australian choose to study science when our Prime Minister ignores the advice of our Chief Scientist on the most important scientific issue facing mankind?

Nev Williams, WallsendOUR pensioners who have mostly worked hard until retirement are having their pensions reduced while some families are claiming extra benefits because they have “multiple wives”. They must be silently laughing at how stupid our government is. Then we had the farce of the Parliament arguing for a week about what to tax backpackers doing the work Australian bludgers are too lazy to do. When I was young I lost my job, my father made me walk up our main street and ask every business if they had any jobs. How times have changed.

Jim Gardiner,New LambtonMR Baird, in relation to residents renting “their places out for a fortune” for the Supercars race, these are our homes, not commercial properties.

Susan Gray, Newcastle EastAS a loyal Knights supporter I would like to ask some questions. What do people get for $500? Is the $500 just a gift from the community? How much discount on season tickets? If it is a board of seven people, will it be volunteers or paid board members? Is this just a business opportunity financed by loyal fans? Is this business plan based on the same plan that was introduced in 1988 which eventually failed? Why did the 1988 plan fail?

Bill Slicer, Tighes HillTHE POLLSDO you prefer the new Supercars circuit?

Yes 72.54%, No 6.93%, I do not support the event 20.53%ARE you a blood donor?

Yes 62.07%, No 37.93%


Bushrangers keep winning

Jimboomba Bushrangers seniors continued their winning ways on Saturday afternoon at Glen Logan Park against Bethania Bullsharks Cricket Club.
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Jimboomba won the toss and chose to bat first.

Jimboomba openers Phil Hayes (39) and Rodney Teese (32) got the team off to a stable start of 57 for the first wicket.

Reid Breeze continued his good form and contributed 38 which included twosixes.

Other good contributions came from Ben Holley 24, Joe Plater 15 and Tony Bear making his debut for Jimboomba with a promising 20.

Jimboomba finished their 40 overs at ninefor 207.

Jimboomba took to field knowing they had to bowl well to defend this total.

Veteran Paul Lorenti led the way for the team and took twoearly wickets to have Bethania twofor sixafter threeovers.

Bethania then steadied the innings throughBill and Nathan until Kel Maguire claimed the third wicket with the total on 45.

Jimboomba continued to take wickets regularly and were in control of the game at the 20 over mark to have Bethania sevenfor 81.

Bethania were dismissed in the 28th over for 122.

Best bowlers for Jimboomba were Rob Lose twofor one, Kel Maguire twofor 21, Tony Bear twofor 22, Paul Lorenti twofor 26.

Both Ben Holley and Braeden Lose each claimed a wicket.

Under 12s Gold

Under 12s Gold hosted Beaudesert Under 12s at Logan Village on Saturday.

Jimboomba won the toss and elected to bat.

Beaudesert started well removing Hayden Steinhardt for four.

Joel Mitchellretired not out on 33 and Noah Plater 62 (also retired not out) then put on a 72 run partnership to get the innings back on track.

Beaudesert were able to take twoquick wickets before 15 over drinks break to have Jimboomba threefor 94.

Claye Wearing 27 not out and Darcy Shelley 18 batted well to have Jimboomba finish fivefor 203 after 28 overs.

Jimboomba took to the field and took regular wickets throughthe first 15 overs to have Beaudesert fivefor 42.

Beaudesert were dismissed after 20 overs for 45 runs.

Bowler of the day for Jimboomba was Ellaura Carlisle twofor oneoff twoovers.

Joel Mitchell, Noah Plater, Hayden Steinhardt, Darcy Shelley and Connor Mills all claimed onewicket.

Under 12s Green

Jimboomba under 12s division 3 green played Springwood at Chatswood Hills State School.

Springwood won the toss and elected to bowl, Jimboomba went to the field with great enthusiasm and displayed some of their tightest bowling of the season so far to dismiss Springwood for 114 in the 28th over.

Best bowlers were Benny Tattersall two for 20 Huntah Cresswell one for nine, Jack Anning one for sevenand Will Whatmore one for 14.

Jimboomba then took to the crease where they made their intentions clear and sent out a message to the rest of the competition that they will be the team to beat this season.

Jimboomba finished their 28 overs at two for 200,top scorers were Huntah Cresswell 66 not out, Jack Anning 40 not outand Tom Anning 27 not out.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Anxious wait is over

Maffra Secondary College Dux Molly Angliss obtained an ATAR Score of 96.75, and hopes to pursue a career in medicine.FOR those that didn’t receive their VCE results early this year, the anxious wait is finally over.
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After 2000 students saw their results five days ahead of schedule following an embarrassing technical glitch, the majority of the class of 2016 found out their results yesterday morning, with local schools thrilled at their students’ hard work and dedication over the year.

Gippsland Grammar’s Dux was Anna Morscheck, who obtained an ATAR score of 98.95, with a perfect score of 50 for English language.

Gippsland Grammar’s median ATAR score was 73.2, and 8 per cent of the students achieved a score above 95, placing them in the top 5 per cent of the state.

Of the entire year level, 19 per cent of students obtained an ATAR score of over 90 putting them in the top 10 per cent of the state, whilst 39 per cent per cent obtained an ATAR score over 80, placing them in the top 20 per cent.

The school’s average study score was 31.4, and as 8.3 per cent of the study scores were over 40, the school will be published on the VCE High Achiever’s list.

The school noted that seven out of their top ten ATARs were scored by girls.

Gippsland Grammar Dux Anna Morscheck is congratulated by Gippsland Grammar principal David Baker.

Gippsland Grammar principal David Baker said the school was thrilled with the outstanding results attained by their high achieving students.

“We would like to congratulate all of our students who successfully obtained their VCE or VCAL certificates and also our dedicated staff who have worked tirelessly to assist these students for many years,” Mr Baker said.

“Another outstanding result for Gippsland Grammar, we’re very proud of all of our students.”

The Dux of Catholic College Sale this year was Sean Duivenvoorden, with a score of 98.05.

Just behind Sean was Serena Lees, who obtained a score of 95.2, Stephanie Howson 94.4, Johanna Allman 95.9, Priyansha Narayan 92.85 and Carly Durrant 91.9.

The school commended Stephanie Howson on her perfect score of 50 in psychology, allowing her to join the other 64 study scores of 40 or above across 15 subject areas, and the 13 per cent of students receiving an ATAR of 90 or above.

Catholic College Sale principal Chris Randell said he was very excited about this year’s VCE results, as well as celebrating the students who have already received their apprenticeships and traineeships.

“These are wonderful results for our students and reinforces our commitment to assisting all students to achieve their chosen pathway,” Mr Randell said.

Maffra Secondary College announced its Dux of 2016 as Molly Angliss, with an ATAR result of 96.75.

The school was thrilled with Molly’s performance, applauding her great commitment and dedication to her studies throughout the year.

“I’m completely surprised and relieved with my score, I can’t believe it,” Molly said.

Molly is looking to pursue a career in medicine, and was fortunate to receive an early conditional offer from a major university.

“I’m going to wait and see what other offers come, but I’m really excited that I’m one step closer to my dream of becoming a GP in a rural community like ours,” she said.

Maffra Secondary College had 58 students complete their year 12 studies this year, and principal Adam Hogan said the year level was a really unique group that had been very close over their six years together.

“They’ve supported and challenged each other all the way through, and we believe this is reflected in their impressive results this year”, said Mr Hogan.

“We’re very proud of all of our students this year, who will go on to access a range of pathways.

“We’re really proud of Molly, who has shown such dedication to her studies this year, and has been a very genuine and passionate individual who has been a great role model across the college.”

Sale College Dux Luka Corrigan obtained an ATAR score of 91.75, and aims to study computer engineering.

Sale College’s Dux was Luka Corrigan, who obtained an ATAR of 91.75, and aims to study Computer Engineering at a tertiary level.

Close behind Luka were Melinda Booth with a score of 90.15, who is considering studying Arts Law, and Amy Purdon with a score of 88.9, who would like to study Commerce IT, and Alex Downie with a score of 87.65, who intends to study Biomedical Science.

Sale College principal Brendan Staple congratulated all the school’s students and staff who worked hard all year to achieve some outstanding results.

“We have had a lot of highlights this year that have been rewarded with many successful stories at this end of the year,” Mr Staple said.

“Our VCAL program has set records for the number of students participating and successfully completing foundation, intermediate and senior levels.

“Many of these students have gained apprenticeships or will go on to further training opportunities.

“In VCE, we have once again got the majority of students through to the end of the year with solid pathways plans that can be achieved with their results.

“The most important thing now is not what you got in terms of results but where they will take you.

“I would like to congratulate all students from our Wellington District schools for their efforts and wish them all the best for their futures.”

Yarram Secondary College had seven students achieve an ATAR of 70 or above, with two students receiving ATAR scores above 90.

In individual subjects, the school had six students achieve a study score of 40 or above, and 19 students achieve subject study scores of 35 or above, with maths and sciences being strong subject areas.

Yarram Secondary College principal David Mowbray said he was extremely pleased with the efforts and results achieved by the school’s Year 12 students this year.

“I’m completely surprised and relieved with my score, I can’t believe it,” Molly said.

Molly is looking to pursue a career in medicine, and was fortunate to receive an early conditional offer from a major university.

“I’m going to wait and see what other offers come, but I’m really excited that I’m one step closer to my dream of becoming a GP in a rural community like ours,” she said.

Maffra Secondary College had 58 students complete their year 12 studies this year, and principal Adam Hogan said the year level was a unique group that had been very close over their six years together.

“They’ve supported and challenged each other all the way through, and we believe this is reflected in their impressive results this year”, said Mr Hogan.

“We’re very proud of all of our students this year, who will go on to access a range of pathways.

“We’re really proud of Molly, who has shown such dedication to her studies this year, and has been a very genuine and passionate individual who has been a great role model across the college.”

Sale College’s Dux was Luka Corrigan, who obtained an ATAR of 91.75, and aims to study computer engineering at a tertiary level.

Close behind Luka were Melinda Booth with a score of 90.15, who is considering studying arts law, and Amy Purdon with a score of 88.9, who would like to study commerce IT, and Alex Downie with a score of 87.65, who intends to study biomedical science.

Sale College principal Brendan Staple congratulated all the school’s students and staff who worked hard all year to achieve some outstanding results.

“We have had a lot of highlights this year that have been rewarded with many successful stories at this end of the year,” Mr Staple said.

“Our VCAL program has set records for the number of students participating and successfully completing foundation, intermediate and senior levels.

“Many of these students have gained apprenticeships or will go on to further training opportunities.

“In VCE, we have once again got the majority of students through to the end of the year with solid pathways plans that can be achieved with their results.

“The most important thing now is not what you got in terms of results but where they will take you.

“I would like to congratulate all students from our Wellington district schools for their efforts and wish them all the best for their futures.”

Yarram Secondary College had seven students achieve an ATAR of 70 or above, with two students receiving ATAR scores above 90.

In individual subjects, the school had six students achieve a study score of 40 or above, and 19 students achieve subject study scores of 35 or above, with maths and sciences being strong subject areas.

Yarram Secondary College principal David Mowbray said he was extremely pleased with the efforts and results achieved by the school’s year 12 students this year.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Short Takes

CONGRATULATIONS Alan Squirefor so eloquently expressing the case for running the proposed Newcastle light rail along the existing rail corridor and not along Hunter Street (‘Running light rail in corridor a win for all stakeholders’,Herald, 8/12). We who live here know only too well that you are correct. Newcastle council should listen to you (and us).
Nanjing Night Net

Kerry Fagan,NewcastleI HAVEN’T been this excited about the Knights’ future for many years. For me it’s not a question of whether to buy shares but rather of how many I can afford. With the repayment scheme and a little budgeting such as Home Brand toilet paper and Aldi beer I’ll be able to buy enough to leave to each of the grandkids when I kick the bucket.

Dave McTaggart, EdgeworthI THINK MrBaird and Michael Cassel are not listening to Novocastrians. You have been told before by the people of the Hunter there is no room down Hunter Street and Scott Street. You don’t live here or drive here. Melbourne and the GoldCoast havewide streets for trams, cars and bicycles. If you want trams, think about it and put them on the corridor where the Hunter people want it, not people from out of town. You are looking after the developers, not us.

George Tattersell,New LambtonREGARDING Mark Burslem’s letter about the proposed V8 race in a heritage precinct (Letters, 12/12), I observe the published “in favour” letter writers live in areas other than the intended venue. If the races eventuate, how about the owners of affected properties not having to pay council rates for the five years as some compensation for their loss of quality of life and possible devaluation of their properties?

June Porter, Warners BayI FIND it strange that food business are hit with stringent food handling laws, which is a good thing, only to have people seated with dogs under tables. What a joke.

Steve Barnett, Fingal BayBLIND Freddy could foresee this parking fiasco in Newcastle when our rail line was cut so quickly and light rail plans were still up in the air.

Trixee Davidson, KotaraDRIVING in Honeysuckle at 7pm on Friday I was thankful I was just dropping someone off. Traffic bumper to bumper looking for a park. The main parking area, which in the near future will no longer be there, was chockers. When this goes, God help us. I am sure all the experts will point out that public transport will save us, but given all the development coming at us, I shudder to think what Band Aid fix will be applied. Traffic plan? Parking plan? Council and state government have no idea.

Tony Morley, WaratahCONGRATULATIONS Newcastle Jets. Well done.

Bill Slicer, Tighes HillTHE POLLSWOULD you buy a $500 stake in the Knights?

Yes 55.27%, No 26.62%, I need more information before I decide18.11%